Forecasts of High Prices for Week May 4-8 – QQQ, SPY, GE, and MSFT

Here are forecasts of high prices for key securities for this week, May 4-8, along with updates to check the accuracy of previous forecasts. So far, there is a new security each week. This week it is Microsoft (MSFT). Click on the Table to enlarge.

TableMay4

These forecasts from the new proximity variable (NPV) algorithms compete with the “no change” forecast – supposedly the optimal predictions for a random walk.

The NPV forecasts in the Table are more accurate than no change forecasts at 3:2 odds. That is, if you take into account the highs of the previous weeks for each security – actual high numbers not shown in the Table – the NPV forecasts are more accurate 4 out of 6 times.

This performance corresponds roughly with the improvements of the NPV approach over the no change forecasts in backtests back to 2003.

The advantages of the NPV approach extend beyond raw accuracy, measured here in simple percent terms, since the “no change” forecast is uninformative about the direction of change. The NPV forecasts, on the other hand, generally get the direction of change right. In the Table above, again considering data from weeks preceding those shown, the direction of change of the high forecasts is spot on every time. Backtests suggest the NPV algorithm will correctly predict the direction of change of the high price about 75 percent of the time for this five day interval.

It will be interesting to watch QQQ in this batch of forecasts. This ETF is forecast to decline week-over-week in terms of the high price.

Next week I plan to expand the forecast table to include forecasts of the low prices.

There is a lot of information here. Much of the finance literature focuses on the rates of returns based on closing prices, or adjusted closing prices. Perhaps analysts figure that attempting to predict “extreme values” is not a promising idea. Nothing could be further from the truth.

This week I plan a post showing how to identify turning points in the movement of major indices with the NPV algorithms. The concept is simple. I forecast the high and low over coming periods, like a day, five days, ten trading days and so forth. For these “nested forecast periods” the high for the week ahead must be greater than or equal to the high for tomorrow or shorter periods. This means when the price of the SPY or QQQ heads south, the predictions of the high of these ETF’s sort of freeze at a constant value. The predictions for the low, however, plummet.

Really pretty straight-forward.

I’ve appreciated and benefitted from your questions, comments, and suggestions. Keep them coming.

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