Links – February 1, 2014

IT and Big Data

Kayak and Big Data Kayak is adding prediction of prices of flights over the coming 7 days to its meta search engine for the travel industry.

China’s Lenovo steps into ring against Samsung with Motorola deal Lenovo Group, the Chinese technology company that earns about 80 percent of its revenue from personal computers, is betting it can also be a challenger to Samsung Electronics Co Ltd and Apple Inc in the smartphone market.

5 Things To Know About Cognitive Systems and IBM Watson Rob High video on Watson at http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/redbooks.nsf/pages/watson?Open. Valuable to review. Watson is probably different than you think. Deep natural language processing.

Playing Computer Games and Winning with Artificial Intelligence (Deep Learning) Pesents the first deep learning model to successfully learn control policies directly from high-dimensional sensory input using reinforcement learning. The model is a convolutional neural network, trained with a variant of Q-learning, whose input is raw pixels and whose output is a value function estimating future rewards… [applies] method to seven Atari 2600 games from the Arcade Learning Environment, with no adjustment of the architecture or learning algorithm…outperforms all previous approaches on six of the games and surpasses a human expert on three of them.

Global Economy

China factory output points to Q1 lull Chinese manufacturing activity slipped to its lowest level in six months, with indications of slowing growth for the quarter to come in the world’s second-largest economy.

Japan inflation rises to a 5 year high, output rebounds Japan’s core consumer inflation rose at the fastest pace in more than five years in December and the job market improved, encouraging signs for the Bank of Japan as it seeks to vanquish deflation with aggressive money printing.

Coup Forecasts for 2014

coupforecast                       

World risks deflationary shock as BRICS puncture credit bubbles Ambrose Evans-Pritchard does some nice analysis in this piece.

Former IMF Chief Economist, Now India’s Central Bank Governor Rajan Takes Shot at Bernanke’s Destabilizing Policies

Some of his key points:

Emerging markets were hurt both by the easy money which flowed into their economies and made it easier to forget about the necessary reforms, the necessary fiscal actions that had to be taken, on top of the fact that emerging markets tried to support global growth by huge fiscal and monetary stimulus across the emerging markets. This easy money, which overlaid already strong fiscal stimulus from these countries. The reason emerging markets were unhappy with this easy money is “This is going to make it difficult for us to do the necessary adjustment.” And the industrial countries at this point said, “What do you want us to do, we have weak economies, we’ll do whatever we need to do. Let the money flow.”

Now when they are withdrawing that money, they are saying, “You complained when it went in. Why should you complain when it went out?” And we complain for the same reason when it goes out as when it goes in: it distorts our economies, and the money coming in made it more difficult for us to do the adjustment we need for the sustainable growth and to prepare for the money going out

International monetary cooperation has broken down. Industrial countries have to play a part in restoring that, and they can’t at this point wash their hands off and say we’ll do what we need to and you do the adjustment. ….Fortunately the IMF has stopped giving this as its mantra, but you hear from the industrial countries: We’ll do what we have to do, the markets will adjust and you can decide what you want to do…. We need better cooperation and unfortunately that’s not been forthcoming so far.

Science Perspective

Researchers Discover How Traders Act Like Herds And Cause Market Bubbles

Building on similarities between earthquakes and extreme financial events, we use a self-organized criticality-generating model to study herding and avalanche dynamics in financial markets. We consider a community of interacting investors, distributed in a small-world network, who bet on the bullish (increasing) or bearish (decreasing) behavior of the market which has been specified according to the S&P 500 historical time series. Remarkably, we find that the size of herding-related avalanches in the community can be strongly reduced by the presence of a relatively small percentage of traders, randomly distributed inside the network, who adopt a random investment strategy. Our findings suggest a promising strategy to limit the size of financial bubbles and crashes. We also obtain that the resulting wealth distribution of all traders corresponds to the well-known Pareto power law, while that of random traders is exponential. In other words, for technical traders, the risk of losses is much greater than the probability of gains compared to those of random traders. http://pre.aps.org/abstract/PRE/v88/i6/e062814

Blogs review: Getting rid of the Euler equation – the equation at the core of modern macro The Euler equation is one of the fundamentals, at a deep level, of dynamic stochastic general equilibrium (DSGE) models promoted as the latest and greatest in theoretical macroeconomics. After the general failures in mainstream macroeconomics with 2008-09, DGSE have come into question, and this review is interesting because it suggests, to my way of thinking, that the Euler equation linking past and future consumption patterns is essentially grafted onto empirical data artificially. It is profoundly in synch with neoclassical economic theory of consumer optimization, but cannot be said to be supported by the data in any robust sense. Interesting read with links to further exploration.

BOSTON COLLOQUIUM FOR PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE: Revisiting the Foundations of Statistics – check this out – we need the presentations online.

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